Raspberry Pi 3

The Raspberry Pi 3 is the successor to the Raspberry Pi 2. It builds upon the Pi 2 by upgrading the ARM cores to Cortex-A53 and adding an onboard single-band 2.4GHz-only wireless chipset.

The Raspberry Pi 3 measures the same 85.60mm x 53.98mm x 17mm, with a little overlap for the SD card and connectors which project over the edges. The SoC is a Broadcom BCM2837. This contains a quad-core Coretx-A53 running at 1.2GHz and a Videocore 4 GPU.

Architecture
ARMv8 Cortex-A53
Processor
Broadcom BCM2837 1.2GHz
RAM
1GB
SD
Micro SD
USB
4
Ethernet
10/100
Wireless
B/G/N, Bluetooth

Note: The Raspberry Pi 3 has higher power requirements than the Raspberry Pi 2. A power supply rated at 2.5A is the official recommendation. Using an insufficient power supply will result in random, inexplicable errors and filesystem corruption.

ARMv7 Installation

This provides the best compatibility with software built around the older revisions of the board, particularly software that requires the vendor libraries.

Replace sdX in the following instructions with the device name for the SD card as it appears on your computer.

  1. Start fdisk to partition the SD card:
    fdisk /dev/sdX
  2. At the fdisk prompt, delete old partitions and create a new one:
    1. Type o. This will clear out any partitions on the drive.
    2. Type p to list partitions. There should be no partitions left.
    3. Type n, then p for primary, 1 for the first partition on the drive, press ENTER to accept the default first sector, then type +100M for the last sector.
    4. Type t, then c to set the first partition to type W95 FAT32 (LBA).
    5. Type n, then p for primary, 2 for the second partition on the drive, and then press ENTER twice to accept the default first and last sector.
    6. Write the partition table and exit by typing w.
  3. Create and mount the FAT filesystem:
    mkfs.vfat /dev/sdX1
    mkdir boot
    mount /dev/sdX1 boot
  4. Create and mount the ext4 filesystem:
    mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdX2
    mkdir root
    mount /dev/sdX2 root
  5. Download and extract the root filesystem (as root, not via sudo):
    wget http://os.archlinuxarm.org/os/ArchLinuxARM-rpi-2-latest.tar.gz
    bsdtar -xpf ArchLinuxARM-rpi-2-latest.tar.gz -C root
    sync
  6. Move boot files to the first partition:
    mv root/boot/* boot
  7. Unmount the two partitions:
    umount boot root
  8. Insert the SD card into the Raspberry Pi, connect ethernet, and apply 5V power.
  9. Use the serial console or SSH to the IP address given to the board by your router.
    • Login as the default user alarm with the password alarm.
    • The default root password is root.

AArch64 Installation

This provides an installation using the mainline kernel and U-Boot. There is no support for the vendor-provided libraries, extensions, or related software. Some of the hardware on the board may not work, or it may perform poorly.

Follow the above instructions, substituting with the following tarball:

http://os.archlinuxarm.org/os/ArchLinuxARM-rpi-3-latest.tar.gz

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